Police wade into ‘criminal’ tweet about eating Weetabix with baked beans

It’s the controversy that’s fired up the British and US embassies, been labeled a “crime” online and even the NHS has weighed in, saying that it should “come with a health warning”.

For, on Tuesday, Weetabix stopped food lovers in their tracks when they announced that beans should be eaten on top of their cereal – rather than on toast.

Taking to Twitter, the brand wrote: “Why should bread have all the fun, when there’s Weetabix?

Serving up @HeinzUK Beanz on bix for breakfast with a twist”.

In just a few hours, the bizarre idea had received over 100,000 likes online and companies, fans and national bodies from across the globe reacted with disdain that beans could ever be eaten with Weetabix.

In fact, it was taken so seriously that even the British authorities got involved – as Greater Manchester Police launched an investigation into Weetabix’s heinous suggestion, saying: “We’ve bean looking into this after a number of complaints today.

“Due to its serious nature, we’ve passed it over to our major incident team who deals with cereal killers!”

However some Twitter users were unimpressed by the force, which was plunged into special measures in December, joining in the banter.

One person tweeted: “Think you lot need to be focusing on the fact you’re so pathetic you’ve been placed into special measures rather than doing up internet jokes.”

Another said: “Good to see you can find the time to p**s about on the internet. Special measures right?

While a third person commented: “Don’t you have criminals to catch.”

A blistering report found the force had significantly deteriorated in its crime recording since 2018 and was now even worse at it than in 2016, when it was rated inadequate.

In response to Weetabix GCHQ said: “We found…No intelligence” in relation to the idea.

Perhaps most worrying, was Pfizer’s reaction to the strange food combination, as they berated Weetabix by saying: “Haven’t our scientists worked hard enough, without having to come up with an antidote to this?”

And not only did the Tweet prove a threat to our health but it also put future international relations at risk, as the US Embassy tweeted that the pairing was not the US-UK “collaboration we were hoping for”.

To which, the British embassy responded with: “Strong opinion from the nation that makes tea in a microwave.”

And Heinz themselves even backed them up, suggesting that foodies try to: “Toast the Weetbix, thin spread of butter and a big helping of Heinz beans.”

But despite its global infamy, Weetabix and beans isn’t the first weird food combination to get our juices flowing.

Last year, Ocado released a survey on the nation’s favourite odd dishes – in a bid to try and encourage people to try new things, from sugar sandwiches, fish fingers and custard, and ketchup and rice.

Meanwhile cheese and jam, and pasta toasties also caused a stir.